Mandi King, Cloud Catcher, 2015, Willandra Lakes Region World Heritage Area / Mungo National Park, Found plastic spun and woven. 150 x 300cm. Photo: Fleur Ruddick

Made with assistance from the Sunraysia Spinners and Weavers Inc.

As a student of sustainable design, Mandi’s research explores new applications for traditional craft practices responding to the ecological effects of climate change.

Drawing from cultural perspectives and adaptation techniques of agricultural and indigenous peoples to drought in the Mallee region, the cloud catcher functions simultaneously as a spiritual offering and passive technology for attracting and harvesting atmospheric moisture.

As an atonement to nature, the tapestry net has been spun and woven from waste plastic foraged around the roads between Mildura and Mungo. It is placed in the Mallee trees to recognize their special role in preserving water within the arid bushlands.

Mandi King, Cloud Catcher, 2015, Willandra Lakes Region World Heritage Area / Mungo National Park, Found plastic spun and woven. 150 x 300cm. Photo: Fleur Ruddick

Mandi King, Cloud Catcher, 2015, Willandra Lakes Region World Heritage Area / Mungo National Park, Found plastic spun and woven. 150 x 300cm. Photo: Fleur Ruddick

Mandi King, Cloud Catcher, 2015, Willandra Lakes Region World Heritage Area / Mungo National Park, Found plastic spun and woven. 150 x 300cm. Photo: Fleur Ruddick

A JamFactory craftsperson and glass designer by training, King recently received a Graduate Diploma in Sustainable Design at the University of South Australia, and is currently pursuing a Master’s by Research degree in the School of Visual Arts.

Since moving to the lush rural landscape of the Adelaide Hills six years ago, King has increasingly devoted her creative practice to exploring pathways for more environmentally and socially conscious design of contemporary craft products, both academically and through the collaboration illumini with fellow Adelaide Hills designer/maker Karen Cunningham. King’s Master’s thesis concerns the design of craft objects as part of an adaptive response to climate change, exploring the integration of both tacit knowing and traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) systems as methodologies for fostering environmentally connected worldviews and behaviours.

“A stubborn experimentalist, I’m faithful to exploring and exploiting the most spontaneous and unique qualities inherent to the material of molten glass. Fluid as water, buoyant as air, and as bright as the light that filters through it. Colour has never been so vibrant, and form never so versatile. Glass is in one word simply, alive. From the first gatherings of hot viscous to contemplating the cooled contours of a finished piece for the first time, every step of the process reveals a galaxy of possibilities I am compelled to express through the practice of object-making. I strive to transform the most innate, yet exciting characteristics discovered along the way into a new vocabulary of eye popping formal elements and design concepts for the future.”

“I am proud to be a part of a movement of young artists who are actively re-imagining the bridge between the worlds of design and craft through our work. My wares demonstrate successful balances of the best sensibilities both approaches of making have to offer. Intimate and intuitive understanding of material combined with fluency in the clean visual language of contemporary design. Clear vision of function in greater contexts. Appreciation for the maximum efficiency of production, with a vested awareness of the greater impact of our objects in the world.”