Catherine Shields, Caveat, 2015, Series of photographic prints, each 560 x 840mm, uniVARS Project | La Trobe University. Photo courtesy the artist.

This body of work seeks to explore what Marsha Meskommen speaks of in relation to performative art as the “potential to signify differently and to materialize female subjectivity otherwise”*, through walking (action), nakedness (state), site (place) and the mechanisms with which I capture and display the subsequent works, the medium.

*Women Making Art: History, Subjectivity, Aesthetics (2003: p3)

Catherine Shields, Caveat, 2015, Series of photographic prints, each 560 x 840mm, uniVARS Project | La Trobe University. Photo courtesy the artist.

Catherine Shields is a multidisciplinary artist currently working with lens-based images, created through rudimentary photographic processes, large digital prints, and video, alongside other methodologies such as performance, drawing and installation.

Exhibitions over the last four years have included a series of works created in response to the breakdown of relationships, and a desire to explore the notion of “boundaries”. They are an archive of mourning and protest. Catherine has integrated her interest in the moving body in private and public domains with the use of autobiography as a political vehicle by placing herself in zones where she does not behave in the prescribed manner specific to those zones. The artist has rolled herself in and out of a sheet outside a Department of Human Services (DHS) building, taken a rubbing from the Bendigo Court briefing table, painted the Allan’s Walk Artist Run Space window in black and allowed graffiti to ensue, and invited viewers to reflect on what could be done in Visual Arts Centre’s (VAC) Access Gallery space in response to her installation of video, soft sculpture, text and photography through allowing their own text to be written on the gallery window. She is currently creating work by walking through railway corridors of Central Victoria. All these places she has a recent historical and emotional connection to, but revisits in ways that take her beyond her experience. She pushes the resulting work into areas that can relate to others’ experiences of being out of line and in the no go zone and explores the paradoxical nature of translating fluid and transient experience into tracks of visual language and communication.